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Patricia Inabnet

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The Mystery Plays at the Masquers

If you need a play to make sense, this show may not be your cup of tea. A technique common to horror and supernatural fiction genres is to dole out sense one sentence at a time. Reality shifts constantly to encompass something previously unimaginable—for a few moments the world is understood—then a new reality changes one’s expectations again.

Know beforehand that The Mystery Plays are two one act plays with completely different styles and largely separate storylines. Neither play follows definitions of modern mystery fiction.

Still with me? Good. The Mystery Plays, written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and directed by Patricia Inabnet, present two mysterious settings which take us on unexpected journeys. The show continues until Feb. 26.

Lady Windermere's Fan at the Masquers

With Oscar Wilde’s writing style as lure, I expected to completely enjoy Lady Windermere’s Fan but my actual reaction was quite different.

In part, I had the incorrect assumption the play was a comedy, so my expectations were upset—though there are many funny aspects. More importantly, much dialogue was difficult—some nearly incomprehensible. Bay Area community theatre management (not limited to Masquers) would do well to reconsider having actors speak in accents which are not their own, as few community theatre actors perform accents well. I’ve discussed this at http://tinyurl.com/pf8vzr

The screenplay of Lady Windermere’s Fan, originally written in 1892, has been reset to the 1950s. Directed by Patricia Inabnet.

Angel Street at the Masquers

Who would’ve thunk it? A genuine thriller full of nail biting suspense on our very doorstep. Angel Street, a Victorian thriller written by Patrick Hamilton, was performed first as Gaslight in 1938 in Richmond (London), England; in 1942 by Vincent Price on Broadway; and, on its 70th anniversary, by the Masquers in Point Richmond, California, which is directed by Patricia Inabnet.

This is a play for breaking rules.